Why is water pressure low in my bathroom?

This can be a really annoying and slightly perplexing situation and if you’ve ever taken a shower that’s more of a dribble than a jet then you’ll know exactly what we’re talking about.

Thankfully, low water pressure in the bathroom can often be resolved without the need to get in touch with a local plumbing firm however, if it persists it’s always best to call in the experts.

Below are some quick and easy solutions to counteracting low water pressure in the bathroom and if you’re bothered by weak flushes or trickling taps then here’s how you get down to business.

Showers

Bathrooms are one of the most common places where low water pressure can become an issue however, there are plenty of ways to ensure you nip it in the bud. If you find your shower isn’t quite as powerful as it used to be although there’s still plenty of water coming out of the taps, then nine times out of ten you’re going to have a build up of hard water deposits. Best advice is to unscrew the head and test to see whether there’s still good water flow coming through the pipe. If there is then give the shower head a thorough clean with vinegar or a recognised brand alternative and this should solve the problem. Alternatively, replace the shower head completely and that’s another DIY job ticked off the list.

Sinks

Sink and bath taps effected by low pressure might have a problem with the aerator. Again, this can simply be a case of removing the tap head and giving the aerator section a good clean however, in some situations it may need replacing so always best to check with an expert if in doubt. If a clean or replaced aerator doesn’t do the trick then you might have a problem with your flexible lines or angle stops. Best advice is to turn off the water and disconnect the sections leading to the tap before turning the water back on again and testing where the blockage is. This is usually a fairly straightforward process but always have a bucket and old towel handy if you want to prevent excess water leakage. Once you’ve located the problem then you’ll either need to clean or replace the offending area however, if you’re unsure what needs to be resolved then give a local plumber a call to ensure peace of mind and a quick job well done.

Toilets

There’s nothing worse than a toilet that takes an age to fill or just doesn’t flush away what it’s supposed to. Toilets that fill at their leisure are often the result of faulty fill valves and a quick an easy way to check is to: turn off the water at the angle stop, disconnect the flex at the toilet end and aim it at a bucket prior to turning the water back on again. Once you’ve ascertained that it’s the fill that’s at fault then cleaning can often be all that’s required to get your loo back up and running. However, in the case of an older model, it’s often best practice to replace the toilet fill and there are plenty of local plumbing firms that will be willing to do the job or point you in the right direction of a good trade stockists.